Tag Archive | fullsteam brewery

Beer Review 0590: Fullsteam Cack-a-Lacky Ginger Pale Ale

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Fullsteam Brewery is located Durham, North Carolina, which makes it a local brewery for me. The craft beer world is going crazy here in North Carolina; not only have some of the big boys came to our backyard with east coast facilities (New Belgium, Sierra Nevada, and Oskar Blues), but we also have a ton of smaller, truly local breweries that are hitting home runs with their beer.

And while beer is exploding here in NC, Fullsteam are seeking to create an identity for beer created in the South: brews that celebrate the culinary and agricultural heritage of this area. Cack-a-Lacky Ginger Pale Ale is a collaboration with Cackalacky, a southern spice company, located in nearby Chapel Hill. The beer is described as a “zippy, hoppy ginger pale ale that’s enjoyable on its own and a perfect compliment to spicy food.” The beer is Fullsteam’s first ever canned offering, and the beer registers 5% ABV (alcohol by volume).

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The pour issued up an average size, frothy and lasting head. The beer was orange-amber in color, and had an exceptionally clear body, free of particles and sediment. It’s a typical pale ale; very clear, a little past golden, and with a fair amount of carbonation. Lacing is excellent, leaving behind solid sheets of foam.

You want some ginger? Well, it’s here on the nose, large and in charge. In fact, it nearly overwhelms everything else; but there are some subtle things going on: hints of lemon peel and herbal spice show the way to some light and sweet caramel malt. But otherwise, this is mostly really fresh ginger with a dusting of complementary lemon peel. Reminds me of a nice sushi plate.

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But the taste is much more than ginger; the initial notes ring out like a great Pale Ale, delivering dry and almost soapy grapefruit with a pinch of caramel. Then comes the ginger, along with lemon peel. The ginger is actually quite sweet in the middle of the mouth, but the hops tame it, crushing the tongue with bitter grapefruit and a touch of pine. In the end, the ginger wins out; the hops dry out the palate but the long, lingering finish of soft and sweet ginger remains. Cack-a-Lacky is medium-bodied, with a thin, foamy mouthfeel.

Yes, I had my doubts: you see, I’m not the biggest fan of ginger to start with, but this is a very refreshing beer and the ginger plays the part of gentle giant. There’s a lot going on in this little beer, and I think you’ll be surprised by it. I’d love to taste the base beer without the ginger, and I’m not suggesting I’d prefer it without ginger, just that it tends to vanquish some of the softer hop flavors that I’m sure are here. This brew is a killer palate cleanser, and it’s no kidding that Fullsteam suggest pairing it with spicy food. I went in with reservations, but left really digging this one. Cool stuff.

Fullsteam Cack-a-Lacky Ginger Pale Ale, 89 points. Price: $1.79 US for one 12 oz. can.

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Beer Review 0317: Fullsteam Fruitcake… The Beer Old Ale

(Editors note: Without the help of Charles Jones, a complete stranger until the release of this beer, I would have never gotten to review or enjoy Fullsteam Fruitcake. Charles graciously got me a bottle and saved it until we could meet up — thanks again! This beer, released a few days before Christmas to a store called Bestway in Greensboro, NC — was denied to me because the store “didn’t have it in their system” despite having the product and knowing for several days they would be receiving it. Bestway is a 45-minute drive from my house, and they wanted me to return the next day to buy it. I later found out that they began selling the beer a mere 30 minutes after I left; I had offered to stay up to an hour so they could “put it in their system.” If your beer travels ever take you to Greensboro, I recommend you skip Bestway and look for other, friendlier places to buy your beer.)

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Fullsteam Brewery is located Durham, North Carolina, which makes it a local brewery for me. The craft beer world is going crazy here in North Carolina; not only are some of the big boys coming to our backyard (New Belgium, Sierra Nevada, and Oskar Blues), but we also have a ton of smaller, truly local breweries that are hitting home runs with their beer.

And while beer is exploding here in NC, Fullsteam are seeking to create an identity for beer created in the South: brews that celebrate the culinary and agricultural heritage of this area. I don’t think I could find a better beer from them to review that holds to this goal — while Fullsteam do have several year-round beers and some seasonals, they also produce a series they call ‘Forager,’ which is beer brewed with ingredients harvested by the community. What a sweet concept!

How it works: Fullsteam uses the interwebs to put out a call for ingredients. You respond, and they pay you market price for your goods, and give you a bottle of the beer when it’s ready. I don’t think I’ve seen another brewery doing this, and I’m proud to have Fullsteam in my home state.

Fullsteam’s 2012 holiday beer is Fruitcake… The Beer, which is an Old Ale brewed with local roasted chestnuts and a combination of grilled local and not-so-local figs. Because of a soft fig harvest, some came from California, but the rest came locally, and harvesters were paid $2 per pound. The chestnuts came from High Rock Farm, which is in nearby Rockingham County. The beer is aged on bourbon barrels and can be aged for extended periods, like a fine fruitcake. Alcohol content (ABV) comes in at 9.5%.

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Fruitcake pours with a large, bright white, creamy head that had soapy bubbles in the center. The head stuck around awhile, before it audibly fizzed away, but as it warmed, it completely disappeared — no swirling the glass to regenerate here. The beer itself was crystal clear; a nice, bright amber in color, and had no particles or sediment. Lacing was minimal, but there were plenty of alcohol legs when the brew was swirled.

Bourbon was heavy on the aromatics; in fact, this is one of, if not the most bourbon-forward beer I’ve ever laid nose to. If you don’t like bourbon, that could be bad…but I love bourbon, so for me, it’s good. Very good. Loads of coconut and woodsy oak, followed by a good dose of fig. It’s so bourbon-y that it borderline hit banana creamsicle. Supporting players were vanilla and caramel. The nose here is quite unique and enjoyable.

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Tasting, and wow, this is nothing like an Old Ale. This hits the palate with lots of coconut, banana, fig, and oak up front, and it warms fast with a big dose of untamed alcohol. The bourbon really takes over in the middle, and the finish comes on with sweetness, a fig/prune note, deep caramel, and toasted oak. The final flavor is a mild bourbon, with a fairly large alcohol burn. I found Fruitcake to be medium-bodied, with a medium mouthfeel, quite foamy when swirled around the tongue.

If going by style, it misses the mark of Old Ale. Bottom line here, a month after being placed in the bottle, this beer is a bourbon bomb and that tends to mask the fig and chestnut flavors. While this might not be “fruitcake” as advertised, if you’re into bourbon barrel aged beers, you’ll probably dig this. With a couple years of age, I think the other flavors will probably come out more. Some people will see this as a sweet boozy mess, and it does walk a fine line…but I found more to like here than dislike. Perfect for the bitterly cold night I enjoyed it.

And, hey… fruitcake is kind of an oddball thing, and this beer is a touch oddball.

Fullsteam Fruitcake… The Beer Old Ale, 87 points. Price: $14.99 US for one 750 ml bottle.

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